Hibernating Rhinos

Zero friction databases

Entity Framework Profiler supports for LinqPAD

If you’re using LinqPAD and wants to profile your Entity Framework usage with the Entity Framework Profiler, you can use the following snippet of code in order to achieve that:

void Main()
{
    HibernatingRhinos.Profiler.Appender.EntityFramework.EntityFrameworkProfiler.Initialize();
    Blogs.Take(50).Dump();
}

Please make sure to use the "C# Program" option from the "language" ComboBox, and that’s it. You can now see the the profiling data in the Entity Framework Profiler.

LinqPAD

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Entity Framework Profiler supports for LinqPAD

If you’re using LinqPAD and wants to profile your Entity Framework usage with the Entity Framework Profiler, you can use the following snippet of code in order to achieve that:

void Main()
{
    HibernatingRhinos.Profiler.Appender.EntityFramework.EntityFrameworkProfiler.Initialize();
    Blogs.Take(50).Dump();
}

Please make sure to use the "C# Program" option from the "language" ComboBox, and that’s it. You can now see the the profiling data in the Entity Framework Profiler.

LinqPAD

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RavenDB is now on Freenode

Our mailing list is probably the most responsive one around. Nevertheless, we thought having an IRC channel could come in handy, so the community would have a place to hang around in, and perhaps also get questions answered quicker once the channel gets big enough.

Come visit us at #RavenDB on Freenode!

BTW - There are quite a few free web UIs available if you don't want to install any software, see http://webchat.freenode.net/ for example

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RavenDB is now on Freenode

Our mailing list is probably the most responsive one around. Nevertheless, we thought having an IRC channel could come in handy, so the community would have a place to hang around in, and perhaps also get questions answered quicker once the channel gets big enough.

Come visit us at #RavenDB on Freenode!

BTW - There are quite a few free web UIs available if you don't want to install any software, see http://webchat.freenode.net/ for example

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RavenDB gets a new face

RavenDB is already a very mature product: the official release was over a year ago, and it is already being used in production by several companies, some for about a year now. Before the official release, RavenDB has been in development for about 2.5 years, totaling more than 3.5 years of active, daily development now. Today we are mainly working on performance improvements, and on perfecting what’s already there.

So much effort has been put into development, that proper documentation was consistently lagging behind. We worked very hard on creating the most awesome document-oriented database around, that we hardly put any thought on visibility, and on spreading the word.

Now that the API has stabilized, and the product is definitely in a very good shape to say the least, it is time to redirect some efforts for making the documentation more comprehensive and up-to-date, and for letting people know how awesome RavenDB is.

The first step for doing this is giving RavenDB a face, a logo, something that people would recognize. After a few weeks of work and polls, we now have a final logo:

We are already hard at work on the next steps – redesigning the website, and creating better user experience with it. Documentation is also catching up quite nicely, and we will soon be blogging about this separately (there’s much to tell…).

You can now also follow the RavenDB project on Twitter: @RavenDB . Starting today, we will be posting updates there as well.

Stay tuned while we work on making RavenDB even more awesome!

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Comments (1)

RavenDB gets a new face

RavenDB is already a very mature product: the official release was over a year ago, and it is already being used in production by several companies, some for about a year now. Before the official release, RavenDB has been in development for about 2.5 years, totaling more than 3.5 years of active, daily development now. Today we are mainly working on performance improvements, and on perfecting what’s already there.

So much effort has been put into development, that proper documentation was consistently lagging behind. We worked very hard on creating the most awesome document-oriented database around, that we hardly put any thought on visibility, and on spreading the word.

Now that the API has stabilized, and the product is definitely in a very good shape to say the least, it is time to redirect some efforts for making the documentation more comprehensive and up-to-date, and for letting people know how awesome RavenDB is.

The first step for doing this is giving RavenDB a face, a logo, something that people would recognize. After a few weeks of work and polls, we now have a final logo:

We are already hard at work on the next steps – redesigning the website, and creating better user experience with it. Documentation is also catching up quite nicely, and we will soon be blogging about this separately (there’s much to tell…).

You can now also follow the RavenDB project on Twitter: @RavenDB . Starting today, we will be posting updates there as well.

Stay tuned while we work on making RavenDB even more awesome!

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Entity Framework June 2011 CTP (v4.2) is now supported in Entity Framework Profiler

When Entity Framework June 2011 CTP was out, we were asked by our users to provide support for it in the Entity Framework Profiler.

As we started to investigate how to provide support for it, we discovered that it’s not that easy task to do. The way that Entity Framework Profiler appender works in nutshell is by replacing the instances of DbProviderFactory (like SqlClientFactory or OracleClientFactory) that the client has on his machine with a custom provider factory that wrap the original provider factory. This wasn’t easy task to do, because Entity Framework June CTP made a few assumptions that make our life more complicated. Specifically:

  • There is an assumption that the provider factory type is not a generic type. This broke our code which is uses a generic provider factory type which wrap each of the providers factories that the client have on the fly, since the client can use any provider factory that he wants.
  • Even if we use non-generic providers for each of the client’s providers, we found out that each provider should be compiled in a separate assembly because of the way that Entity Framework matches providers.

We’re working with the Entity Framework team in order to find a solution for this in the future versions, but in the mean time if you’re using the Entity Framework June 2011 CTP we temporary worked around this issue with a temp API that by providing a non-generic provider factory of type SqlClientFactory, which means that in the meantime you’ll be able to use the Entity Framework profiler only with Sql Server:

EntityFrameworkProfiler.TempApi_InitializeForV42_CTP();

In addition, you’ll need to add the following assembly redirection to your config file in order to instruct the profiler to use the correct version of Entity Framework:

<runtime>
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity name="System.Data.Entity" publicKeyToken="b77a5c561934e089" culture="neutral" />
            <bindingRedirect oldVersion="4.0.0.0" newVersion="4.2.0.0" />
        </dependentAssembly>
    </assemblyBinding>
</runtime>

The main problem is that we can’t currently easily support providers other than SqlClient, if you do need that support on the new CTP, please let us know, and we will provide you with a custom version for that purpose. Considering that this is a CTP version, we decided to provide a partial solution that will work for most of our users and we’re working with the Entity Framework team in order to find a better solution.

Happy Profiling

The Hibernating Rhinos Team

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Comments (5)

Entity Framework June 2011 CTP (v4.2) is now supported in Entity Framework Profiler

When Entity Framework June 2011 CTP was out, we were asked by our users to provide support for it in the Entity Framework Profiler.

As we started to investigate how to provide support for it, we discovered that it’s not that easy task to do. The way that Entity Framework Profiler appender works in nutshell is by replacing the instances of DbProviderFactory (like SqlClientFactory or OracleClientFactory) that the client has on his machine with a custom provider factory that wrap the original provider factory. This wasn’t easy task to do, because Entity Framework June CTP made a few assumptions that make our life more complicated. Specifically:

  • There is an assumption that the provider factory type is not a generic type. This broke our code which is uses a generic provider factory type which wrap each of the providers factories that the client have on the fly, since the client can use any provider factory that he wants.
  • Even if we use non-generic providers for each of the client’s providers, we found out that each provider should be compiled in a separate assembly because of the way that Entity Framework matches providers.

We’re working with the Entity Framework team in order to find a solution for this in the future versions, but in the mean time if you’re using the Entity Framework June 2011 CTP we temporary worked around this issue with a temp API that by providing a non-generic provider factory of type SqlClientFactory, which means that in the meantime you’ll be able to use the Entity Framework profiler only with Sql Server:

EntityFrameworkProfiler.TempApi_InitializeForV42_CTP();

In addition, you’ll need to add the following assembly redirection to your config file in order to instruct the profiler to use the correct version of Entity Framework:

<runtime>
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity name="System.Data.Entity" publicKeyToken="b77a5c561934e089" culture="neutral" />
            <bindingRedirect oldVersion="4.0.0.0" newVersion="4.2.0.0" />
        </dependentAssembly>
    </assemblyBinding>
</runtime>

The main problem is that we can’t currently easily support providers other than SqlClient, if you do need that support on the new CTP, please let us know, and we will provide you with a custom version for that purpose. Considering that this is a CTP version, we decided to provide a partial solution that will work for most of our users and we’re working with the Entity Framework team in order to find a better solution.

Happy Profiling

The Hibernating Rhinos Team

Tags:

Published at

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Comments (5)

Entity Framework June 2011 CTP (v4.2) is now supported in Entity Framework Profiler

When Entity Framework June 2011 CTP was out, we were asked by our users to provide support for it in the Entity Framework Profiler.

As we started to investigate how to provide support for it, we discovered that it’s not that easy task to do. The way that Entity Framework Profiler appender works in nutshell is by replacing the instances of DbProviderFactory (like SqlClientFactory or OracleClientFactory) that the client has on his machine with a custom provider factory that wrap the original provider factory. This wasn’t easy task to do, because Entity Framework June CTP made a few assumptions that make our life more complicated. Specifically:

  • There is an assumption that the provider factory type is not a generic type. This broke our code which is uses a generic provider factory type which wrap each of the providers factories that the client have on the fly, since the client can use any provider factory that he wants.
  • Even if we use non-generic providers for each of the client’s providers, we found out that each provider should be compiled in a separate assembly because of the way that Entity Framework matches providers.

We’re working with the Entity Framework team in order to find a solution for this in the future versions, but in the mean time if you’re using the Entity Framework June 2011 CTP we temporary worked around this issue with a temp API that by providing a non-generic provider factory of type SqlClientFactory, which means that in the meantime you’ll be able to use the Entity Framework profiler only with Sql Server:

EntityFrameworkProfiler.TempApi_InitializeForV42_CTP();

In addition, you’ll need to add the following assembly redirection to your config file in order to instruct the profiler to use the correct version of Entity Framework:

<runtime>
    <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity name="System.Data.Entity" publicKeyToken="b77a5c561934e089" culture="neutral" />
            <bindingRedirect oldVersion="4.0.0.0" newVersion="4.2.0.0" />
        </dependentAssembly>
    </assemblyBinding>
</runtime>

The main problem is that we can’t currently easily support providers other than SqlClient, if you do need that support on the new CTP, please let us know, and we will provide you with a custom version for that purpose. Considering that this is a CTP version, we decided to provide a partial solution that will work for most of our users and we’re working with the Entity Framework team in order to find a better solution.

Happy Profiling

The Hibernating Rhinos Team

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Published at

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Comments (5)

RavenDB Profiling Support

When we built the RavenDB profiling support, we intentionally built it in such a way that you can have multiple ways of accessing it.

Out of the box, we come with a VS debugger visualizer and an MVC Profiler for your websites. The VS Debugger Visualizer is pretty ugly (fully functional, of course, just not that pretty), but we are very proud of the MVC Profiler support and how it looks:

image

The real fun part is that we aren’t the only ones that can access those API, the screen shot below was taken from a Glimpse extension that adds RavenDB Profiling support:

image

That is quite impressive, even if I say so myself, and it shows what happen when you aren’t overly fond of the internal keyword.

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Published at

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Comments (5)

RavenDB Profiling Support

When we built the RavenDB profiling support, we intentionally built it in such a way that you can have multiple ways of accessing it.

Out of the box, we come with a VS debugger visualizer and an MVC Profiler for your websites. The VS Debugger Visualizer is pretty ugly (fully functional, of course, just not that pretty), but we are very proud of the MVC Profiler support and how it looks:

image

The real fun part is that we aren’t the only ones that can access those API, the screen shot below was taken from a Glimpse extension that adds RavenDB Profiling support:

image

That is quite impressive, even if I say so myself, and it shows what happen when you aren’t overly fond of the internal keyword.

Tags:

Published at

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Comments (4)